A blog by the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration about justice and peace issues

Posts tagged ‘CRS’

Catholics Confront Global Poverty webcast

With Liz in Colombia this week, we’ll use this space to share a webcast invitation from our friends at Catholics Confront Global Poverty (the webcast is tomorrow, April 14).

Please join Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) for a Catholics Confront Global Poverty webcast:
Extracting Natural Resources with People in Mind:
Addressing Root Causes of Conflict and Poverty
with
Olun Kamitatu – Regional Technical Advisor, Extractive Industries, Central Africa Region/Catholic Relief Services (in Kinshasa, DRC),
Rev. Juan Molina, O.SS.T. – Latin America and Global Trade Policy Advisor, Office of International Justice and Peace, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
and
Rees Warne – Strategic Issues Advisor, Extractives Industries, Catholic Relief Services/USA
Wednesday, April 14
2:00-3:00 PM Eastern Time
 
RSVP now! 

This Catholics Confront Global Poverty webcast will explore issues around the extraction of natural resources in the developing world such as the links between minerals and conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). We will examine the Church’s approach to natural resource extraction and discuss concrete ways for Catholics in the United States to have a real impact in helping people around the world ensure that their oil, minerals and other natural resources can fuel development.
 
This webcast will provide:
1. An on-the-ground view from a CRS staff person working with people affected by the extraction of natural resources ;
2. An overview of CRS’ response and support for the people who live there;
3. USCCB and CRS’ policy recommendations for how U.S. policymakers can make a difference on these issues based on Catholic social teaching and our experience;
4. Ideas on how Catholics in the U.S., through the Catholics Confront Global 5. Poverty initiative, can support greater transparency; in natural resources extraction in the developing world;
6. An opportunity to ask the presenters questions about these issues and engage them in dialogue.

RSVP now

Haiti, Pat Robertson and Christian Love

Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere, has been hit by a number 7 earthquake. The island that was just beginning to crawl out from beneath the impact of four hurricanes has now been leveled by another natural disaster. It has neither the money nor the infrastructure to cope with such a huge crisis.

It is important to understand that the reasons Haiti has neither the money nor the infrastructure to cope with this disaster has many roots. Like so many desperately poor countries around the world, Haitian sovereignty and resources have often been taken out of  Haitian hands and put into the pockets of others, including the United States. The extent of this disaster is not the fault of the Haitian people.

I would like to offer two suggestions to help. The first comes from Pat Robertson and the second from Latin American and Caribbean Community Center.

Below I offer a quote from Pat Robertson, who suggests that when the Haitians revolted against their slave masters to get their freedom in 1804, they made a pact with the devil. And because of seeking their freedom and this pact they have been cursed and that is why the earthquake happened.

“Something happened a long time ago in Haiti, and people might not want to talk about it,” Mr Robertson, 80, said yesterday on his Christian Broadcasting Network show, The 700 Club.

Haitians were originally “under the heel of the French. You know, Napoleon the third, or whatever. And they got together and swore a pact to the devil,” said the former US presidential candidate.

“They said, `We will serve you if you will get us free from the French’. True story. And so the devil said, `OK, it’s a deal’. Ever since, they have been cursed by one thing after the other.”

Mr Robertson contrasted Haiti with the neighbouring Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola. The Dominican Republic “is prosperous, healthy, full of resorts etc,” he said. “Haiti is in desperate poverty. Same island. They need to have . . . a great turning to God and out of this tragedy. I’m optimistic good may come.”

I invite folks to let the world know that a Christian response to this disaster is not to make a racist claim that revolting against slavery would have meant making a deal with the devil. That God does not punish anyone, lest of all the poorest amongst us with earthquakes. And that we as Christians have a better solution than blame – we offer love and solidarity which gets me to the second action.

To support our brothers and sisters in Haiti, I  recommend checking out Catholic Relief Services, they have good opportunities to help. Another resource is Center for International Disaster Information , it provides links to organizations providing assistance.  
 
  Peace, Liz

FSPA partners with Catholics Confront Global Poverty

We’re excited to tell you about our new partnership with Catholics Confront Global Poverty (an action alert is below). The FSPA Justice, Peace & Integrity of Creation committee decided to partner with this organization to contribute to the work of confronting the challenge of global poverty.

The initiative  is a partnership between the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and Catholic Relief Services and is inspired by Pope Benedict XVI’s 2009 World Day of Peace Message: Fight Poverty to Build Peace.

This initiative aims to mobilize one million Catholics in the U.S. to confront global poverty by defending the life and dignity of people living in poverty throughout the world. It focuses on seven key areas:

  • U.S. international assistance
  • peacekeeping
  • debt relief
  • fair trade
  • natural resource extraction
  • migration
  • global climate change

This effort provides a way for Catholics to confront these poverty issues by praying, learning, acting and giving.

Here’s an action alert from our friends at Catholics Confront Global Poverty:

Tell Senators on Key Committees: 

Protect the Poor in Climate Legislation
Take Action Now! Contact your Senator now and urge that the Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act (S. 1733, the climate change bill) now being considered:
Fully protect low-income individuals and families in the U.S. from any potential rise in the price of energy and other consumer goods resulting from the legislation by providing the same level of funding for low-income assistance as in the House bill;
Significantly increase the funding for international adaptation programs. At a minimum allocate $3.5 billion of funding generated by the bill to international adaptation programs starting in 2012 and increase rapidly to $7 billion annually by 2020 so that people living in poverty around the world can be protected from the effects of climate change.

Why is action important now?

The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee will likely vote on this climate change legislation this week. This begins a serious and overdue effort to face up to our moral and environmental challenges.

What is the Church’s position?

Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA) and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) seek climate legislation that achieves two fundamental goals: care for creation and protecting the poor and vulnerable—both at home and abroad—who contribute least to climate change, but suffer its worst consequences. While we are encouraged by language in the Kerry-Boxer bill acknowledging the need to protect poor people worldwide, we are deeply concerned that the level of funding for these provisions is well below what is needed.

What does climate change have to do with my Catholic faith?

The Catholic Church brings a unique voice to the climate change debate by lifting up both the moral dimensions of caring for God’s creation and the needs of the most vulnerable among us. The Catholic bishops’ primary concern is to place the life, dignity and needs of the poor and vulnerable at the center of climate legislation. Poor people should not bear an undue burden of the impacts of climate change or the global adjustments needed to address it. To learn about Catholic teaching on climate change, read the June 2001 statement by the United States Catholic Bishops, Global Climate Change: A Plea for Dialogue, Prudence and the Common Good.

How is the Catholic Church confronting the effects of climate change?

The Church promotes prudent action in the face of the growing impacts of global climate change and is seeking common ground for the common good in a very polarized debate. CRS has already witnessed the tragic consequences of climate change in the daily lives of people living in poverty and is working diligently to help affected communities through health, agriculture, water, and emergency preparedness programs in 100 countries. USCCB, CCUSA and CRS are members of the Catholic Coalition on Climate Change that invites Catholics to join the Catholic Climate Covenant. Through the Catholics Confront Global Poverty initiative, USCCB and CRS are mobilizing one million Catholics to learn, pray and act in support of policies that will help address the effects of climate change on poor people worldwide.

TAKE ACTION NOW: Contact your Senators below who are members of the Environment and Public Works, Foreign Relations and Finance Committees now – through e-mail, phone calls, or FAX letters.
 
John Kerry, MA (sponsor)
Barbara Boxer, CA (sponsor)
Richard Lugar, IN
Benjamin Cardin, MD
Joseph Lieberman, CT
Max Baucus, MT
Thomas R. Carper, DE
Frank R. Lautenberg, NJ
Bernard Sanders, VT
Amy Klobuchar, MN Sheldon Whitehouse, RI
Tom Udall, NM
Jeff Merkley, OR
Kirsten Gillibrand, NY
Arlen Specter, PA
George Voinovich, OH
Lamar Alexander, TN
Robert Menendez, NJ
Bob Casey, PA
For more information, contact:
Cecilia Calvo, USCCB Environmental Justice Program Coordinator: 202-541-3188, ccalvo@usccb.org
Tina Rodousakis, CRS Grassroots Advocacy Manager: 410-951-7462, trodousa@crs.org
Monica Maggiano, CCUSA Campaign to Reduce Poverty in America Director: 703-236-6230, mmaggiano@catholiccharities.org

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