A blog by the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration about justice and peace issues

 (AP Photo/Narciso Contreras)

(AP Photo/Narciso Contreras)

8th Day Center for Justice Says NO to Bombing Syria

8th Day Center for Justice rejects the false claim that bombing Syria will help its civilians, prevent further alleged use of chemical weapons or serve to protect the United States from a chemical weapons attack.

If bombing is the consequence for using chemical weapons does Iraq get to bomb the United States for using phosphorus and depleted uranium in its invasions in 1990 and 2003? Does Vietnam get to bomb the Unites States for dropping napalm?

It is time–long past time–to stop the dangerous game of cloaking geopolitical interests in human rights and democracy language. Bombing does not protect the human rights of civilians. It does not rebuild communities in order for displaced Syrians to return home. It does not “teach” a government how to behave in civil war. What is it teaching? The immorality of war itself.

The bombing does open the door so the complicated, ongoing power games for resources and regional control will continue at the expense of civilians around the globe. We urge you to read more on this point by Nafeez Ahmed from the Guardian: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2013/may/13/1.

As citizens of the earth community we must do more than simply say no in private places. We must say no in public spaces. Now is the time to demand that the United States government not use the tragic and grotesque killing of civilians with a chemical weapon as its excuse to further an agenda for resources and regional control.

8th Day Center for Justice urges our constituents to check out the options for action below from the Sisters of Mercy Justice Team and join us in saying NO! to war in Syria.

Sisters of Mercy

You may take this action with the following simple steps for each of your senators and your U.S. Representative:

  1. Look up your legislators’ local phone numbers. Their local offices are listed on their websites, which you may find here for senators and here for U.S. representatives.
  2. Express your concerns to the person who answers the phone, using the sample script below, if it is helpful
    “Hello, my name is ________, I live in _____ and I oppose U.S. military action in Syria. I call on the senator/representative to instead support strong, multi-lateral diplomacy through the United Nations to bring all parties and regional actors to the table to negotiate a ceasefire and lasting solution to the conflict. The UN should be urged to protect the Syrian community, stop the flow of arms to all sides, and uphold the ban on chemical weapons without escalating the violence.”
  3. For Catholic members of Congress, offer to send the statements from Pope Francis, the U.S. Bishops, and Mercy Institute’s Leadership Team (links provided below).

Also, consider ways to make public and visible your opposition to a U.S. military strike and your support of urgent, diplomatic efforts. Write a “letter to the editor” to your local newspaper. Organize or join a prayer vigil—and call the media to cover it. (8th Day would encourage all who can to join your local anti-war rallies.)

Here is a sampling of statements, analysis and prayer resources that you can use to lift up the message in various venues in your community.  Mention the names of your senators and representatives in your public efforts and call on them to vote “no” to any authorization for a military strike.

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Comments on: "NO to Bombing Syria" (1)

  1. Reblogged this on FSJPIC.

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